Consultant/Board of Directors

Dr. Harry Strulovici

Harry Strulovici, MD, MPH, received his bachelor's degree and master's degree in Global Public Health from New York University, and his medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. From 2007 to 2008, he was a Yale/Johnson & Johnson Career Physician in International Health. He has worked at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, performing surgical repair of women with obstetric fistulae.

During trips to Uganda Dr. Strulovici has advocated for changes to current reproductive health policy with local university and government officials and has spoken at Parliament House advocating for women's access to health care. He has met with government officials and other stakeholders such as USAID, PEPFAR, UNFPA and President Obama's Global Health Initiative, to address maternal, neonatal and child mortality in developing countries. In late 2008, he founded Life For Mothers, a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization in the US, which also has a local chapter in Uganda and Kenya. The mission of the foundation is to develop sustainable, cost-effective health policy to reduce maternal/neonatal mortality in developing countries by empowering women and strengthening health care systems. He has developed a holistic model to reduce maternal/neonatal/infant mortality in rural Uganda. This pilot project was a collaboration between Life for Mothers and the Local Government of Mityana with the assistance local community health workers and other organizations, including WHO, MoH, and local NGOs (AIDS Information Center). This Phase l pilot was implemented and completed in late 2011.

Presently, he serves as as a consultant to the Harold and Pauline Price Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at the
UCLA Anderson School of Management.

Dr. Strulovici was a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at NYU School of Medicine and the Director of the International Maternal Health Initiative within the Division of Reproductive Global Health. He workied Dr. Robert Porges who is Chairman of the Division of Reproductive Health. In March 2010, Dr. Harry Strulovici lectured on A Holistic Strategy to Reduce Maternal/Neonatal Mortality in Rural Uganda at the New York Academy of Medicine and in June 2010, Dr. Strulovici was the speaker and presenter at the World Bank on 'A Holistic Strategy To Reduce Maternal/Neonatal Mortality in Uganda.'

Dr. Strulovici was the lead consultant on PMTCT For Proposal Submission by the Central Republic of Africa (RCA) to the Global Fund (GF) - Round 10 – August 2010 where he: (1) Worked with the Chief HIV/AIDS section of UNICEF and the heads of HIV in CAR to prepare   the final document addressing the needs of the national partners as well as the strategic preferences of the GF Technical Review Panel to ensure the highest possibility of acceptance of the proposal.

He was also a speaker and presenter of Life for Mothers work at the mHealth Summit in Washington, DC – December 2011 – ‘Integrating mHealth Technology and Holistic Health Care Delivery to Reduce Maternal/Neonatal/Child Mortality in Rural Uganda – Preliminary Findings from Pilot Project- Phase l (completed May 2011).

Life for Mothers was selected for Poster Presentation at the 9th annual Western Regional International Health Conference at the University of Washington - Seatte, Wa.- April 2012 - This conference focused on unaddressed health issues, and aimed to discuss solutions to these problems.

XlX International AIDS Conference selected Life for Mothers Abstract - "Development of a Baseline Needs Assessment for HIV Services in Rural Uganda using mHealth Technology and Community Health Workers (CHWs) to Strengthen Health Systems: A Random Cluster Study" for poster presentation – July 2012 – Washington, DC. Dr. Strulovici was the lead author along with Dr. Al Osborne from the UCLA School of Management.

He has had correspondences and letters published in the New York Times, The Lancet,  Volume 381, Issue 9879, 18–24 (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673613610740)  May 2013, Pages 1718
 and most recently in the New Yorker (responding to Dr. Atal Gawande's "Slow Ideas"--July 20, 2013).

In addition to over twenty years of surgical experience, Dr. Strulovici has published several articles and case reports and conducted research at the Microsurgery Laboratory at Baylor University in Houston, Texas.

To access the full Draft Report of Life for Mothers Pilot Project CLICK HERE


 

Dr. Manuel Trujillo

Manuel Trujillo, MD, is Director of the Program in Public & Global Psychiatry, Professor of Psychiatry, and Vice Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Trujillo has a distinguished record as an academic clinical administrator, clinical services innovator and researcher in specialized areas of clinical psychiatry. He was Director of Psychiatry at New York University / Bellevue Hospital from 1991-2008, having come to Bellevue Hospital after holding senior clinical and administrative positions at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and other Schools of Medicine in New York City. Dr. Trujillo has been involved extensively in the fields of urban, cross-cultural and community psychiatry and has helped develop many programs and services for the mentally ill. He has written and presented extensively (both nationally and internationally) on Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy and Cross-Cultural Psychiatry among other topics. During his term at Bellevue Hospital he developed numerous innovative clinical programs such as culturally competent programs for Asians and Hispanics and directed the Department's extensive involvement in the psychological aftermath of September 11th, including outreach efforts to victims, families, children, rescue workers and other at risk populations.

Dr. Trujillo is the recipient of many research and service grants designed to:

  • improve the outcome of treatment of severe and persistent mental illness such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorders
  • to create culturally competent treatment services, and
  • to integrate psychiatric and addiction services into primary care.

Some of this research (through New York State's Outpatient Commitment Pilot Program) has also contributed to the development of statewide policies providing optimum community care for seriously ill psychiatric patients. Dr. Trujillo's efforts at Bellevue Hospital to enhance the cultural competence of the program and to address culturally mediated health disparities are numerous. Currently, Bellevue Hospital operates an array of culturally systemic inpatient and outpatient programs for Hispanics and Asians. Educationally, the Department is also participating in the development of policy for public mental health initiatives such as developing Multicultural Centers of Excellence, prevention of Latino suicide and others. Most recently, Dr. Trujillo has developed the New York University's Fellowship in Public Psychiatry and is developing other academic programs in Public and Global Psychiatry.


Hon. Sylvia Ssinabulya


Hon. Sylvia Ssinabulya is a member of Ugandan Parliament, and is the Publicity Secretary of the Parliamentary Forum on Population, Food, Security and Development, as well as a founding member of the network of African Women Ministers and Parliamentarians and coordinator of the Network's activities for central Uganda. Previously, Ms. Ssinabulya was a member of Mubende District Local Government in Uganda, serving as the Secretary of Education and Chairperson of the Mubende Non Formal Education Project. Ms. Ssinabulya received a Bachelor of Education from Makerere University, a Postgraduate Diploma in Management from the Uganda Management Institute and a Masters in Public Health Leadership from Uganda Christian University. She has also received Certificates of Trainer of trainers for Women leaders by the Active Learning Centre/Glasgow Caledonia University and in Gender Budgeting by GTZ Nairobi Kenya. Ms. Ssinabulya's advocacy work focuses on the promotion of women's sexual and reproductive health rights both in Parliament and with a number of national and international organizations. In addition to lobbying for increased government funding for maternal health programs in Uganda, she has participated and made contributions in several international and African regional conferences on reproductive health, specifically those aimed at reducing maternal mortality in developing countries. Recently, Ms. Ssinabulya has been involved in researching and reviewing health providers practices in the provision of maternal healthcare services to adolescent mothers in Mityana District, Uganda.

 

Hratch Kaprielian

Mr. Kaprielian immigrated to the United States in 1971 where he pursued a career in the jewelry industry. Starting as a diamond setter, Mr. Kaprielian worked his way up to become a successful entrepreneur, with interests in businesses worldwide. These include Franck Muller USA, a lucrative watch business, an Icelandic horse breeding farm in Iceland, Kaprielian Enterprises, a jewelry manufacturing business in New York, Artsakhbank in Armenia, and numerous real estate developments. Mr. Kaprielian is also engaged in various philanthropic organizations including the Hovnanian School and Armenia Fund in New York, as well as countless charities in Armenia.

 

Hon. Ruth Nankabirwa

Throughout her university studies and thereafter, Ms. Nankabirwa has been a champion for women’s issues in Uganda.  Among numerous positions in this capacity, she served as Chairperson of the District Women’s Council , District Delegate to the National Women’s Council and Member of the Forum for Women In Democracy.  Ms. Nankabirwa served as representative for Kiboga District in the Constituent Assembly and, since 1996 to date, has held that distinguished seat in Parliament. Ms. Nankabirwa is also the current Minister of State for Microfinance.

A native Ugandan, Ms. Nankabirwa received her Bachelors Degree, as well as a Masters Degree in Peace and Conflict Studies, from Makerere University.  


Did you know?

Women in developing countries are 300 times more likely to die than those in the industrialized world.

Source:UNICEF, 2010


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